How to Win Endorsements from Local Organizations
Local Unions, Environmental Groups, Womena��s Groups, and More!

Why Are Endorsements So Important?
Endorsements can give emphasis to a campaign in several ways:

Validation: Organizations, such as local unions and social movement groups can lend credibility to candidates by providing political context to newcomers or expanding support for elected officials seeking higher office.

Money: Even the most effective, efficient campaigns require funding. Organizations can bolster a campaigna��s coffers or even help a fledgling campaign compete against a crowded and/or competitive field.

Press: Along the lines of validation, an organizationa��s stamp of approval often draws media attention. Organizations issue press releases announcing their endorsements, write and place supportive op-eds at crucial junctures, and promote activities that can generate buzz with reporters.

Volunteers: An organization can mobilize its members to volunteer on your behalf. Local members can amplify your message to neighbors, co-workers, and friends, while national members can fundraise and make calls in support of your campaign.

Votes: Organizations not only bolster a campaigna��s Get Out the Vote efforts leading up to election day, but can also encourage its local members to turn out and vote.

What Is The Process?

The standard endorsement process often includes five steps: (1) Introductions and Initial Meetings; (2) Questionnaires and Interviews; (3) Follow-Up; (4) Endorsement; and (5) Financial Benefit.

There are several key factors to keep in mind while going through the process:

  • A strong introduction can go a long way — reach out to your networks to determine the who might be able to provide most effective introduction to an organization.
  • Do your homework — research past endorsed candidates to ensure your campaign would be a good fit, and have a firm grasp of the organizationa��s goals and work.
  • Remember this is a political process — it takes time; be patient.

 

How Should A Campaign Approach Endorsements?

It is not as hard as one might think! Pick up the phone, call the local organization chapter and request a questionnaire. Once youa��ve completed it, head to the local meeting political committee executive board or membership meeting and ask for their endorsement. Keep an open line of communication. And if you are planning to be near their national or international headquarters, ask the local chapter to set up a meeting.

Avoid sending emails to info@ accounts asking for an endorsement — you wona��t get terribly far, if anywhere at all. Do not ask for money before taking the time to go through the endorsement process. Always call the local chapter before reaching out to national or international. And by no means tell the national that local has endorsed if they havena��t or vice versa.